David Gail Smith - Capstone Project for Bachelor of Fine Arts in Studio Art

Southern Methodist University - Class of 2017

Overview – Capstone Statement – Formalization v1 – Formalization v2 – Grant Request – Midterm Reflection – Research –  Show – Comments

Overview:

The purpose of this page is to provide a record and documentation of my capstone project in the pursuit of a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Studio Art.  You will find writings, images, and a place to provide feedback and comments.  It is my intent to share a “behind the scenes” look into my research methods and work process for this project.  It represents a significant milestone in my development as an artist.  There are also documents associated with the actual BFA qualifying exhibition on hand.  For those who are working on their capstone project and who may be here to see an example, I hope this shines some light on your path.  For all others, I hope you find this insightful and enjoyable.

– David Gail Smith

Click here to explore my entire website

Final Capstone Statement

May 7, 2017

This project has been a journey of growth and discovery. I set out to make “honest” paintings. By this, I mean that this is the first body of work into which I have made a concerted effort to infuse the pieces with serious and personal emotional content based on reflections from my experiences. I discovered that I can connect myself, my body, my movements, my mind, and my feelings into a painting using scale, mark-making, materiality and color. I discovered there is value in setting out to work without an “end-state” in mind. This has not come easily. The journey has required vulnerability, failure, introspection, catharsis, openness to harsh criticism, and an acceptance that others may not like or agree with my work or my ideas. It has been confusing, difficult, and humbling. Conference with other artists (my peers, my professors, curators, and many visiting artists) has been instrumental in my delivery. I am deeply grateful to them all despite often feeling tormented about my progress and the commentary. I cannot rest in one place about the work because it is not done. Each painting has been a step in a progression that I will continue to explore until it is exhausted. And by then there will be several new paths to explore. This is not a quick trip, but a lifelong journey. This is where I stand today, knowing the direction will change as I discover my way.

Following a military career that spanned more than two decades, I am now compelled towards deep emotional introspection in search of commonalities among human beings that exist despite cultural, social, and political differences. I ponder what I have in common with a man who lived many thousands of years before me. In what ways are my experiences in today’s modern world the same as his?  This question drives my artistic exploration and research. My creative practice involves the new – computer code and creative technologies, as well as the old – painting. And sometimes I combine them.

Ambiguous symbols and abstract mark-making harness emotional surges as I reflect on my experiences. The personally meaningful color combinations, aggressive scale, and gestural style of my paintings represent my physicality and movement in reaction to this reflection. In this work I attempt to question and explore the primal tendencies that are present within all of us, just beneath the surface as we survive the modern age. My experience and interests in the technology of our contemporary world are at one end of a continuum. Balancing, at the other end, is something I share with ancient man – a primal impulse to make images.

Formalization – version 1

February 15, 2017

For my Capstone project, I plan to paint a mural, approximately 8’ x 12’.

Size details:

The painting will be completed on six 4’ x 4’ canvases for portability and ease of installation, however the combined canvas will form one homogenous image.

Materials:

The painting will be completed in acrylic colors using large brushes and rollers.

Procedure:

A photo reference or multiple photo references will be used for the composition.  The reference photo will be either a single staged photo that I take, or it will be an original composition comprised of multiple photo references that will be combined with digital tools to create a new image.

Subject and “style”:

The subject matter has not been completely determined yet, as I am leaving flexibility for the exploration of subject matter with my studies to guide my final decision.  I am confident that the final subject matter will include at least one animal figure, symbols from the natural world and/or ancient cultures, as well as some element of humanity (hands, a face, etc.)  The final composition will be determined at a later date.  My subject matter and final composition will be a statement about one (of many) universal truths about humanity.  These are things that are as true today as they were during the pre-civilization of and pre-history of man.  My goal is to have the image presented be immersive and presented in a manner that makes people see human commonalities (instead of divisions) across cultures.  The composition might include images from photos I have taken during my travels or daily life or images from dreams or memories.  The brush strokes and paint will be handled in a “loose” manner in an attempt to evoke memory and dreams and nature.

Timeline:

February 24 – Foundations room – display scale study (8’ x 12’ charcoal, ink acrylic on Tyvex), along with collected reference materials, and smaller studies.  (Hands holding Raven staged photo)

March 9 – Doolin – display mural work-in-progress with expanded reference materials and studies.

Date to be determined – display completed project at BFA Capstone qualifying show.

Formalization – version 2

February 23, 2017

For my Capstone project, I plan to paint a mural, approximately 9’ x 18’.

Subject and “style”:

At the moment, the subject I have chosen is a Black Raven being held by two human hands. In the background is a grove of craggly trees. The objects in the frame are all familiar (a bird, hands, trees), “timeless” (this could have happened last night or a million years ago), but their interaction is not (not everyone has held a bird of this size in this manner). What is happening to the bird? Is it hurt? Is it a meal? Is it a sacrifice? Is it a companion? What are the intentions of the “hands”? One interpretation – Human intention is something that should be questioned. We as humans are collectively responsible for the state of our world, no matter our culture or differences. These symbols can mean many different things to different people. A bird can be a symbol of peace or hope or special vision. It might represent an object (like the world, for example). Ravens were once used as messengers. Ravens can be seen as evil or darkness. And hands can be loving and cruel. There are many possibilities. So this painting suggests many things and not one thing. And the meaning might change from viewer to viewer, something I welcome. I do not want it to mean anything specific to the viewer. I’m inviting people to look inside themselves to find what the image means to them, realizing this image can be a link between two very different people, much the way the moon appears in the sky the same way to people on opposite end of the Earth.

The final subject matter for the mural has not been completely determined yet, as I am leaving flexibility for the exploration of subject matter with my studies to guide my final decision, but the hands holding the bird is “in the ballpark” and might actually be the final image.  I am confident that the final subject matter will include at least one animal figure, symbols from the natural world and/or ancient cultures, as well as some element of humanity (hands, a face, etc.)  The final composition will be determined at a later date.  My subject matter and final composition will be about one (of many) universal truths about humanity.  These are things that are as true today as they were during the pre-civilization of and pre-history of man.  My goal is to have the image presented be immersive and presented in a manner that makes people see human commonalities (instead of divisions) across cultures.  The composition might include images from photos I have taken during my travels or daily life or images from dreams or memories.  The brush strokes and paint will be handled in a “loose” manner in an attempt to evoke memory and dreams and nature, much like the sketch I am working.

Size and surface details:

The painting will be completed on five 40” x 96” sheets of matte photo print paper (posters, basically, resulting in a mural approximately 8’ x 16’). Ideally the surface will relate to the subject, but I must consider other logistical factors in selecting the surface as well due to the scale of the work. These factors include ease of disassembly and reassembly, portability, studio size constraint, breakdown of materials during movement, etc. When installed, the papers will form one homogenous image.   I have not worked exactly how the papers will be joined. They might possibly just hang side-by-side without being joined, if this adds value to the work.

Mark-making materials:

The painting will be completed in acrylic colors using large brushes and rollers with a charcoal and graphite under-sketch. Other materials may be incorporated if my study process seems to invite them.

Procedure:

A photo reference or multiple photo references will be used for the composition.  The reference photo will be either a single staged photo that I take, or it will be an original composition comprised of multiple photo references that will be combined with digital tools to create a new image.

Timeline:

February 24 – Foundations room – display scale study (8’ x 12’ charcoal, ink acrylic on Tyvex), along with collected reference materials, and smaller studies.  (Hands holding Raven staged photo)

March 9 – Doolin – display re-worked sketch mural work-in-progress with expanded reference materials and studies along with finalized plan for finished work.

Date to be determined – display completed project at BFA Capstone qualifying show.

Grant request

March 13, 2017

Project Proposal Application: The Doolin Art Materials Fund

These funds are intended for the sole use of art students who wish to realize ambitious projects that require expensive art materials or specialist equipment not ordinarily a part of the Division’s resource.

Please note that all equipment such as cameras, computers, etc. will remain the property of SMU’s Division of Art after students use them for their project. This fund can also be used to pay for services by vendors such as specialty printers, metal shops, graphic designers, video editors, etc. This fund is not meant to fund travel, research expenses, or framing.

Eligibility for funding is limited to MFA, BA or BFA students in the Division of Art. An eligible student may apply for funds for projects related to required coursework or any other independent project that is deemed relevant to the student’s degree program.

Students may apply for up to $1000 once per academic year.

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

Application requirements:

Students should fill out the application form and have their sponsoring faculty sign it and attach a brief letter of recommendation. Any faculty member teaching a course in the division of art at the time of application may be a sponsor, including the chair of the Division of Art.

The whole application should be scanned as a PDF and submitted to Noah Simblist, Chair and Associate Professor of Art via email at nsimblis@smu.edu. 

 

Project Proposal Application: The Doolin Art Materials Fund

Student Name: David G. Smith

SMU ID: ———–

Date of application: 13 March 2017

Your degree program: BFA Studio Art

Sponsoring Professor: Jay Sullivan

Project Proposal (200 words): I plan to make two large oils paintings as an element of exploration for my capstone project.

This material will yield:

2 each 90” x 65” paintings

This grant will allow me to explore my concept further and produce several more works towards the body of work surrounding my capstone. Due to the scale that I am currently using, the cost of materials is becoming prohibitive. I have already made 4 large paintings using my own funds/resources and would like to continue this line of exploration.

Project Budget: (please include each item, its estimated cost and a total)

$ 547.56          Oil paints (Blick.com)

$  38.65          Gesso (Blick.com)

$ 97.42          Unprimed canvas

$   50.00          Wood for canvas frames (Lowes)

———–

$ 733.63         Grand total

Have you ever received Doolin funds before? If so please describe the project, the date that you received the money and the total amount granted.

October/November 2015, $388.62, I was given funds for materials to fabricate custom painting surfaces using the CNC machine. Some of the works from that grant were accepted into the Mercedes Benz Financial Group Show last year.

Student signature:                               ___________________________

Signature of sponsoring faculty:         ___________________________

Midterm Reflection on Capstone

March 18, 2017

David G. Smith
About my current paintings and line of inquiry.

After the initial exercise for the Capstone course where we inventoried our courses, artists we values, experiences, interests, etc., I formulated my initial direction. I started with idea that I want to transcend political and social constructs as subject matter and to focus on finding “universal truths” about humanity that connect all people from the dawn of man. I was pursuing ambiguous symbols that were absent of time-markers as a way to this connection. I was pursuing that larger scale for several reasons – I wanted to push into something I had not tried – I felt the ideas were big enough to warrant the scale (bigger than any one person) – I had been drawn to many artists that made murals or large-scale paintings. I painted the Captive Bird painting.

Captive Bird (in progress) – 9’ x 18’ – Latex on Tyvek – March 1, 2017

I felt as though my drawing had loosened up and became freer on this scale and was excited by this prospect. Since I was working on Tyvek with latex paint for cost purposes, I did not feel so precious about what I was making and this was also freeing. By then I had completed studio visits with Minerva Cuevas and Lionel Maunz. Along with other professors and my (oft ignored) inner voice, I had repeatedly been told that I was not doing my “facility” any justice because I was not digging into topics that are particular and personal.

So I began to think that one of the things that ties us to our ancestors is the emotional responses we have to whatever is happening in our times – be it financial stress, stress over current politics of the world, or stress over defending your family or tribe from wild animals. Simultaneously, I was stuck for a couple of weeks trying to paint an image of a photograph I had taken long ago that had significant emotional content for me, but that would likely have not been apparent to anyone else. So I decided that I needed to paint about my military experiences in away that was as freeing as the Captive Bird mural. I then painted “Fortitude” which is the same materials and freedom of “Captive Bird” but completely abstract

Fortitude – Latex on Tyvek – 95″ x 145″ – 2017
“Fortitude” – 8’ x 15’ – Latex on Tyvek – March 5, 2017

I also painted another right away, but was not satisfied with the result. Something was bothering me about the Tyvek and I wanted to try a surface that was more professional-looking. I was still pushing to embrace the same process of dismissing editorial thoughts and focusing on a feeling or experience and my reaction to it while I painted. I felt I did not accomplish this in painting this piece, and therefore have not named it.

Untitled – 80” x 132” – Latex on photo paper – March 6, 2017

“Fortitude” felt natural and free but I was till not feeling connected to the materials. Early on in the semester I had made a large canvas (65 x 90 inches) and felt compelled to do something abstract on it, when I was painting the 100 small paintings, but I did not act. It had been sitting in my studio since the beginning of the semester. The size of it seemed right for me – as tall as my reach without a ladder, wide enough that I needed to move about to cover it. I had been thinking a lot about my experiences because of my studio visits and decided I would just paint while thinking about those times, without setting out to paint anything in particular. I painted “Temet Nosce” in a few hours, while just thinking about my life and allowing my body and arm to move without restriction or thoughts of editing. When these thoughts arose I dismissed them.

Temet Nosce – Oil on canvas – 65″ x 90″ – 2017

“Temet Nosce” or “Know Thyself” – 65” x 90” Oil on Canvas – March 11, 2017

The marks are not calculated, but more savage, natural, and unrefined. I feel they are more reflective of the way that I naturally meet the world. I named the painting after it was completed. The latin phrase means “Know Thyself” and I felt this is one of the first paintings that I have made that is really honest, authentic, and about my personal experience. There are a couple of others in my past that come close, but not to the level of this one. Coincidentally, the others that come close are ones that I have in my studio that were the initial fuel for this line of inquiry: A self- portarit and a dream image of a horse on fire. That phrase “Temet Nosce” is also something that has been a touchstone for me throughout my military career as it was spoken long ago by Chilon of Sparta, an ancient Greek sage. It also happens to be a piece of timeless wisdom that has been recorded by sages throughout history around the globe.

While the painting’s abstraction might not speak directly to others about my experience, the space created by the painting, the scale, and the mark-making tie back to my body as it moves in reaction to my thoughts and reflections. In this painting I really am “knowing myself”. And I know I’m being natural and honest when I paint this way, so I’m confident that people will react to that.

Last night (March 17) I painted another painting in the same size, medium, and process, but I am not quite sure what to name it. Another latin phrase from my military past is “Auxilium Cito”, which means “Speedy Help”, comes to mind as my military career has been about helicopter rescue from the beginning. Another possible name is “Offering for a Demon” since there really are demons that I live

now because of all of those experiences. Perhaps I will name it “Auxilium Cito – An Offering for a Demon”. I want to make more of these. I am also tempted to try to translate this new-found freedom back into something representational. I am not sure where to direct all of this energy over the next couple of weeks. And, honestly, I feel gratified by the process, but equally frustrated and tormented. Some days I wonder if it is normal or if I’m losing my goddam mind. This is when I want to turn to mentors, but I also feel like standing on my own. Which is right?

There are also some practical limitations that I am grappling with. It’s expensive to buy oil paint for a 65” x 90” canvas. A 65” x 90” canvas is heavy and if it’s wet, it is a real problem to move it without plenty of help. Which image will I put in the Capstone show? I’ve already made two big oil paintings on my own dime and plan on making at least one more.

In my readings, discussions, and research, I am seeing similarities in this line of inquiry to German Expressionism and Abstract Expressionism. So I have been reading and researching these topics. And I will continue to write. What I’m reading reflects a sentiment similar to my own. Many of the German Expressionists volunteered for the military. They believed war was simultaneously horrible but also an inescapable and unfortunate part of humanity. They sought truths from the ancient world and felt connected to ancient man.

I have written this new Artist’s Statement in reaction to these discoveries.

New artitst’s statement

My work involves emotional introspection. While more than 2 decades of military experience has obviously influenced my perspective, I strive to find themes that span humanity and cross cultural, social, and political boundaries. While it is impossible to completely avoid them, I steer away from direct engagement of current social and political issues as subject matter, as they are often divisive and my work searches for the human commonalities among all people. Ambiguous symbols, abstract mark-making that harnesses my personal emotional surges, and color combinations that have significant meaning to me are elemental to my paintings. The scale and gestural style reflect the aggressive and physical aspects of my personality, and the loosely-caged savage tendencies that are present in all of us.

Aviation and Aerospace have been around for just over one century, a drop in the bucket of time and history. Having

been completely immersed in this high-technology world from over 20 years has spawned me to explore more ancient themes. I ponder what I have in common with a man who lived one million years before me. This question drives my artistic exploration and research. My education and interest in technology are at one end of a continuum, which I seek to balance with my painting and image-making at the other end of that continuum, which is as old as ancient man.

SMITH’S MANIFESTO VIS-A-VIS PHILIP GUSTON

By David Gail Smith

BFA Capstone Course

Professor Jay Sullivan

Southern Methodist University

Dallas, Texas

May 6, 2017

This document is a brief analysis of how my work can be informed by Philip Guston’scareer and ideas.  Here I study his work and words beside my own, and weigh them all in an attempt to inform my own practice moving forward.  To begin I will provide a brief expository of Guston’s life.

Philip Guston was born in Canada in 1913. He attended the Los Angeles Manual Arts High School and began making murals early on. (see Figure 1) Beside high school and one year of formal training at Otis Institute, Guston had little formal education in art.  Philip Guston is well known as one of the Abstract expressionists of the 1950s, alongside other artists like Pollock and Motherwell.  During this time he departed from the earlier representational work of his murals from the 1930’s, as a Works Progress Admiinistration artist.  He was inspired by Renaissance painters like Pierro della Francesca, Mexican muralists like David Siqueiros, and especially by the Italian painter Giorgio de Chirico (Wikipedia, 2017) and began painting abstractly.  It is this work, and his path to making it, that is of greatest interest, as it is an decade long exploration of sorts, in which Guston turned abruptly from his previous manner of working to learn something new, only to then return to the representational again, certainly incorporating his new discoveries.  Later in his career he returned to representational images and began painting in an iconic style and palette.  (Ashton, 1990) This act of using painting to explore and research is something that ties it directly to other academic fields, yet simultaneously sets it apart from the same.  For example, science is rational and painting or “art” is not necessarily so., yet both are a form of research, exploration, and creativity.  

“This study [of abstraction] led him in the early fifties to Mondrian…” (Sichel, 1994)(see Figure 2)The time period of Guston’s exploration of abstraction spans from approximately 1952 – 1964 (Guston, 1980) with paintings like To B.W.T., 1952 (see Figure 3)Fable, 1956-57(see Figure 4), and The Light, 1964. (see Figure 5)  In To B.W.T. one can immediately see the similarities with Mondrian’s Composition. There is a bridled energy in  Mondrian’s Composition, comprised of short horizontal and vertical lines, bound and balanced in a delicate equilibrium, all floating over a neutral background, and all about to collapse at the slightest jolt. Guston’s To B.W.Talso has a structure of short horizontal and vertical lines against a neutral backgroundonly his structure is sticker.  It will not fall when jolted.  One could pull it apart and it will probably still stand, the way a mound of clay will stay up even if you pull some from the bottom.  Guston’s seems more connected to the fluid and non-concrete world of feelings and thoughts, while Mondrian’s seems more connected to the physical world.  Both have made something beautiful and contemplative, but each has accomplished that in a very different manner. 

One of the great things about abstract paintings is that they allow the viewer to “take their own journey”, perhaps spiritually or emotionally, instead of being channelized by the image of a known object.  Or, as put by Guston, “In a painting in which this is the room, this is the chair, this is the head, the imagery does not exist, it vanishes into recognition.”  (Jewish Museum, 1965)  For this reason, as well, the title of an abstract work takes on a more significant role, as it often guides the viewer.  So there is significance in leaving a work untitled, or naming it some thing vague such as Composition (See figure 1) or Fable (See Figure 4).  The moment an abstract artists gives a painting a specific name, like Clock (see Figure 6), the viewer is inclined to start looking for the components of a clock, as he or she knows it in the world.  This then raises a question for the artist, namely the question of what is being painted.  In comparing the painting Painter III of 1963 (see Figure 7) with Untitled of 1962 (see Figure 8), we can see Guston using the same palette and marks.  With the specific title Painter III, I cannot help but see a head, a face, an arm, and a brush.  So I wonder if I would have seen those things had I not first read the title.  I struggle to see objects in Untitled.  And I wonder which one is “better” or “more beautiful”, given their similarities.   And for this reason I believe maybe Guston is not really painting the object, but instead something more about human feelings about the object or the idea.   In the case of Painter III, I would assume he is the painter and perhaps this (even unconsciously) is a painting about how he feels about himself.  He is speaking in a language that cannot really be captured by a title.  The words of any spoken or written language are too limiting to really convey the meaning.  And this is why painting is still important and relevant, and why it will continue to be so into the future.  A painting says volumes more than words and is able to convey and invoke personal emotional content unlike any other language in the world.  

The struggles, victories, or defeats that we face in life are our own and nobody can feel or understand them in the way that we do about ourselves.  Some of these timeless human themes are as follows: Human fragility versus resilience., the survival instinct / will to live,  our ability to compartmentalize fear and horror in order to act towards a goal, a maximum effort for something bigger than an individual.  The process of facing these struggleis what defines human existence.  And trying to share them on a surface with imagery is as old as man himself.  And like the impulse to make images, this is a connection that we share with ancient man.  On Guston“His concern with the aboriginal impulse to art was readily related to the tendency during the 1950s and early 1960s to see painting in terms of process or, as Harold Rosenberg said ‘action’.”  (Ashton, 1990)  And the personal nature of sharing these things has a way of making connections with others.  There is a strength and beauty in having the courage to share personal emotion, even if not in a literal sense. “Thus, Expressionism is not merely a question of technique or form, but, above all, a spiritual attitude (gnosiological, metaphysical, ethical) that has not appeared in human history overnight, but dates back thousands of years.” (Baron, 1997)

As put so eloquently by Guston himself, “The real question is … painting and sculpture are very archaic forms.  It’s the only thing left in our industrial society where an individual alone can make something with not just his own hands, but brains, imagination, heart, maybe.  It’s a very archaic form.  Same thing can be said with words, writing poetry, making sounds, music.  It’s a unique thing.  Just imagine ninety-nine percent of the people just report somewhere, are digits, go to an office, clear a desk, get plastered, and then, they do the same thing again the next day.  So what is this funny activity you do?  What is it?” (Sichel, 1994) Guston’s belief was that making art was about one’s experience and about self-improvement. (Sichel, 1994)  So these paintings aren’t about the objects.  The paintings are relics of Guston’s cathartic efforts of research and self-improvement.

On painting abstractly, Guston says, “There was a sense of embarking on something for which you didn’t know the outcome.” (Sichel, 1994)  As Guston returned to the figurative and representational after his period of abstraction, I wonder how accomplished this with those paintings, or if he still believed it.  A question arises, “How does one imbue an image of a shoe(one of Guston’s post-abstract paintings in which he returns to representational (see Figure 9))with as much emotion as a non-objective painting?”   Is it the marks?  Is it the state of mind of the painter?  Is it a “flow” the artist is experiencing, pouring emotions out through the arm?  For now, I will revel in the discoveries I have made in Guston’s work.  But these sorts of questions are my future points-of-departure that will guide further research and exploration as I embark on my personal journey as an artist.

 

References:

Ashton, Dore, 1990, Yes, but–: a critical study of Philip Guston. Berkeley: University of California Press. 

Barron, Stephanie, and Wolf-Dieter, Dube, 1997, German Expressionism: Art and Society, London: Thames and Hudson.

The Jewish Museum, 1965, Philip Guston, Recent Drawings and Paintings, New York, Clarke and Way, Inc.

Kunstmuseum Bonn, 2000, Phjilip GustonTablaeux/Paintings 1947-1979, Ostfildern-RuitGermany, Hatje Cantz Publishers

Sichel, Kim, Philip Guston, and Mary DrachMcInnes, 1994, Philip Guston, 1975-1980: private and public battles. Boston: Boston University Art Gallery

Guston, Philip, 1980,  Philip Guston: catalog of an exhibition held at the San Francisco, Museum of Modern Art …, May 16, 1980 – Sept. 13, 1981, New York, NY: G. Braziller

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1962Philip Guston: [Exhibition, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, May 2-July 1, 1962; Los Angeles County Museum, May 15-June 23, 1963]. New York. 

Wikipedia, 2017, Philip Guston. [online(April 2017) Available at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Guston [Accessed 5 Apr. 2017]

Figure 1: Philip Guston, A detail of Guston’s Queensbridge Mural. 1940.

Source:  http://publishing.cdlib.org/ucpressebooks/data/13030/f0/ft4x0nb2f0/figures/ft4x0nb2f0_00014.jpg

Figure 2: Piet Mondrian, “Composition”, Oil on Canvas, 47.5” x 39 7/8“, 1914

Source:

https://www.kimbellart.org/sites/default/files/styles/large_800/public/tms/APG1983_03_MAIN1.jpg?itok=7W0B7X85

Figure 3: Philip Guston“To B.W.T.”, Oil on Canvas, 48” x 51”, 1952

Source:  http://www.radford.edu/rbarris/art428/gustonforbwt.jpg

Figure 4: Philip GustonFable, Oil on Canvas, 64 7/8” x 76 1/16”, 1956-57

Source:

http://www.kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu/files/imagecache/portfolio_enlarge/artwork/16089.jpg

Figure 5: Philip GustonThe Light, Oil on Canvas, 69” x 78”, 1964

Source:  http://www.themodern.org/sites/default/files/guston5_0.jpg

Figure 6: Philip Guston, The Clock, Oil on Canvas,  193.1cm x 163cm, 1956/57

Source: (Kunstmuseum Bonn, 2000)

Figure 7Philip Guston, Painter III, Oil on Canvas, 167.6cm x 200.6cm, 1963

Source: (Kunstmuseum Bonn, 2000)

Figure 8: Philip Guston, Untitled, Oil on Canvas,  162.6cm x 190.8cm, 1958

Source: (Kunstmuseum Bonn, 2000)

Figure 9: Philip Guston, Shoe, Acrylic on Masonite,  76.2cm x 81.3cm, 1968

Source: (Kunstmuseum Bonn, 2000)

BFA Qualifying Exhibition

May 6 – 20
Opening Reception: May 6, 6pm – 8pm

Floor Plan + Checklist

1. Ashley Eden Beal

Dream 1 Aquatint Print 22.5 x 30 in

2. David Gail Smith

Study for Temet Nosce Oil on wood panel 9.75 x 8 in

3. Rick S Yun

Mu I
Oil on Canvas 48 x 54 in

Mu II
Oil on Canvas 40 x 30 in

4. Gabrielle Hakes

Isle of Sta a Studies Stoneware and High- re Glaze Dimensions Variable

5. David Gail Smith

Temet Nosce Oil on canvas 90 x 65 in

6. D.S. Chapman

A series of actions performed according to a prescribed order (2017) Book
8 x 10 in

Exercise Reel (2017) Digital Video
12 min, 53 sec

Cocoon (2017) Found Object 36 in x 90 in

Transmutation Ritual Live Performance
2 hours

7. Desiree Baker-Fletcher

Can I Help You

Charcoal, ink, and acrylic 35.5x 26.1 in

Untitled (I Hope You Didn’t Go to a Job Interview Like That) Charcoal, ink, and acrylic
35.5x 26.1 in

8. Candy Warth

Aura
Intaglio monoprint 30 x 44 in

Nebula
Intaglio monoprint 30 x 44 in

Zipped
Intaglio monoprint 30 x 44 in

9. Corinne Price

Whimsy Collage Print 24.5 x 17 in

Whimsy II Collage Print 24.5 x 17 in

10. Lauren Price

Vertebrae Etching
14 3⁄4 x 22 in

Heart Etching
14 3⁄4 x 22 in

Kidney Etching
14 3⁄4 x 22 in

11. Marina Stana

Wada color combination #272 Acrylic on canvas
48 x 48 in

12. Ashley Eden Beal

Dream 2 Aquatint Print 22.5 x 30 in

13. Sarah Fun

Dear Mel (2017) Ink on glass 80x 57 in

& (2017) Ink on glass 80 x 57 in

14. Marina Stana

Ink
24 x 19 in

15. Mark Maxey

Gaze heuristic
Plexiglass, inkjet, generative imagery 11 x 6 in

16. Jessica M. Cole

Bird Head and Tree
Paper mache, blueboard, yarn, sheet metal, hot glue, moss, resin. 40 x 14 x 24 in

17. Money Stax

Fuck Ya Couch Installation & Book 87 x 36 x 30 in

18. Sally J Kim

Gift Exchange
Print, board, acrylic pieces, table, chairs 16.5 x 16.5 in

19. Meagan Robson

The Witness
Metal rod, pig intestines 44 x 36 x 44 in

20. Nicolás Gonzáles

Rid-Ches Shingle, wood 72 x 12 in

(many animals)

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Temet Nosce (installed) – Oil on canvas – 65″ x 90″

Temet Nosce (installed) - Oil on canvas - 65" x 90"

Face After Borondo

Face After Borondo

Untitled – Latex on Tyvek – 100″ x 132″ – 2017

Untitled - Latex on Tyvek - 100" x 132" - 2017

Captive Bird – Latex on Tyvek – 8′ x 16′ – 2017

Captive Bird - Latex on Tyvek - 8' x 16' - 2017

Temet Nosce (detail)- Oil on canvas – 65″ x 90″ – 2017

Temet Nosce (detail)- Oil on canvas - 65" x 90" - 2017

Temet Nosce – Oil on canvas – 65″ x 90″ – 2017

Temet Nosce - Oil on canvas - 65" x 90" - 2017

Study 2 for Temet Nosce – Oil on paper – 8″ x 8″ – 2017

Study 2 for Temet Nosce - Oil on paper - 8" x 8" - 2017

Fortitude – Latex on Tyvek – 95″ x 145″ – 2017

Fortitude - Latex on Tyvek - 95" x 145" - 2017

Study for Temet Nosce – Oil on Canvas – 8″ x 8.5″ – 2017

Study for Temet Nosce - Oil on Canvas - 8" x 8.5" - 2017

Flyer – Front

Flyer - Front

Flyer – back

Flyer - back

Study for Temet Nosce (installed) – Oil on Board – 8″ x 8.5″ – 2017

Study for Temet Nosce (installed) - Oil on Board - 8" x 8.5" - 2017

Exit – Oil on canvas – 65″ x 90″ – 2017

Exit - Oil on canvas - 65" x 90" - 2017

Defensible – Oil on canvas – 65″ x 90″ – 2017

Defensible - Oil on canvas - 65" x 90" - 2017

Auxilium Cito – Oil on Canvas – 65″ x 90″ – 2017

Auxilium Cito - Oil on Canvas - 65" x 90" - 2017

Auxilium Cito (detail) – Oil on Canvas – 65″ x 90″ – 2017

Auxilium Cito (detail) - Oil on Canvas - 65" x 90" - 2017

Bali Hai – Oil on canvas – 65″ x 90″ – 2017

Bali Hai - Oil on canvas - 65" x 90" - 2017

Bali Hai (detail) – Oil on Canvas – 65″ x 90″ – 2017

Bali Hai (detail) - Oil on Canvas - 65" x 90" - 2017

100 Paintings

100 Paintings

Captive Bird (in progress 1) – Latex on Tyvek – 8′ x 16′ – 2017

Captive Bird (in progress 1) - Latex on Tyvek - 8' x 16' - 2017

Captive Bird (in progress 2) – Latex on Tyvek – 8′ x 16′ – 2017

Captive Bird (in progress 2) - Latex on Tyvek - 8' x 16' - 2017

Captive Bird (in progress 3) – Latex on Tyvek – 8′ x 16′ – 2017

Captive Bird (in progress 3) - Latex on Tyvek - 8' x 16' - 2017

Captive Bird (staged photo 1)

Captive Bird (staged photo 1)

Captive Bird (staged photo 2)

Captive Bird (staged photo 2)

Captive Bird (staged photo 3)

Captive Bird (staged photo 3)

Captive Bird (in progress 4) – Latex on Tyvek – 8′ x 16′ – 2017

Captive Bird (in progress 4) - Latex on Tyvek - 8' x 16' - 2017

Temet Nosce with Artist

Temet Nosce with Artist

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